NEWS & ANALYSIS

GA Secretary of State Wants Fulton County Elections Taken Over by State


In the aftermath of the 2020 election, Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger wants Fulton County elections taken over by the state.

“I think people are saying, enough is enough,” Raffensperger told Just the News. He discussed using the new election integrity law to have the State Elections Board take over the Fulton County election counting prior to the 2022 midterm elections.

When asked whether the state using the law to take Fulton County into receivership was an option, he said “yes is the answer.”

“With SB 202, habitually failing counties can – actually the state election board can – come in and replace the election director and really take over the governance of that,” he said.

As previously reported by Human Events News, a contractor chosen to monitor ballot counting in Fulton County wrote a 29-page memo highlighting “massive” election integrity failures and mismanagement during the 2020 election.

The November report cited a slew of problems, including double-counting of votes, insecure storage of ballots, possible violations of voter privacy, the removal of election materials at a warehouse and the movement of “too many” ballots on Election Day, per Just the News.

“This seems like a massive chain of custody problem,” Carter Jones wrote in the memo delivered to Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger’s office after the election.

“What he said was it’s all this mismanagement,” Raffensperger said in reference to the report. “The upside, positive note was that he did not see illegality or ballot stuffing. But all that mismanagement, dysfunction, what it does, it creates voter distrust, and it really lends itself to conspiracy theories. So it needs to be fixed. It’s our largest county. And you know, people that live in Fulton County, like I do, I’m tired of it. But so is everyone else who lives in the other 158 counties.”

He added that the state plans to fight the Biden Justice Department lawsuit challenging the election law.

“There’s been progressives in the Justice Department for years that have been working on trying to stop election reforms that are common sense reforms, that make sure that we can objectively identify voters,” he said. “You think about it, we’ve had photo ID for years in Georgia voting, and they said that was going to depress turnout. It didn’t. We’ve had record turnout.”