NEWS & ANALYSIS

American Medical Association Puts Critical Race Theory Above All


The American Medical Association, the largest organization representing physicians and medical students across the nation, says it will replace meritocracy with “racial justice.” 

In simpler terms, the American Medical Association is now embracing critical race theory

On Tuesday, the association released an 86-page three-year roadmap outlining how the group will use its influence to dismantle “structural and institutional racism” and advance “social and racial justice” throughout the healthcare system.

According to the plan, per the Epoch Times, the organization will implement several strategies, including “racial and social justice” throughout the culture, systems, policies and practices; expanding medical education to include critical race theory; and pushing toward “racial healing, reconciliation, and transformation.”  

The AMA also indicated that it now rejects the concepts of “equality” and “meritocracy,” which have long been goals in the field of medical science and care. 

“Equality as a process means providing the same amounts and types of resources across populations,” the association said. “Seeking to treat everyone the ‘same’ ignores the historical legacy of disinvestment and deprivation through historical policy and practice of marginalizing and minoritizing communities.” 

“The commonly held narrative of meritocracy is the idea that people are successful purely because of their individual effort,” it said. “Medical education has largely been based on such flawed meritocratic ideals, and it will take intentional focus and effort to recognize, review and revise this deeply flawed interpretation.” 

Instead, medical schools should incorporate critical race theory, which ultimately furthers inequality in all areas of society. 

In a statement, AMA President Gerald Harmon said he is “fully committed to this cause” and called on everyone in the medical field to join the fight. 

“We believe that by leveraging the power of our membership, our influence, and our reach, we can help bring real and lasting change to medicine,” he said. 

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