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Obama polls below 50 percent in 37 states

Gallup bears some poor re-election prospects for President Obama.

President Barack Obama‚??s approval ratings fell below 50 percent in 37 states with his lowest popularity recorded in Utah with 26 percent, according to a new Gallup poll.

‚??The 50 percent approval mark is significant because post-WWII incumbent presidents who have been above 50 percent job approval on Election Day were easily re-elected,‚?Ě said the poll released Wednesday. ‚??Presidents with approval ratings below 50 percent have more uncertain re-election prospects.‚?Ě

For example, the poll lists some of the rarities including former Presidents Harry Truman and George W. Bush as two presidents who won with low ratings, and Jimmy Carter, Gerald Ford, and George H.W. Bush as presidents who lost with the low ratings.

The telephone survey was conducted from January to June and included 90,000 adults with a margin of error for individual states of three to eight percent.

Obama was most popular in the District of Columbia with an 83 percent approval rating, followed by Hawaii with 63 percent, Rhode Island with 58 percent, Vermont with 56 percent, and New York, Massachusetts and Maryland with 55 percent.

Utah Democratic Chairman Jim Dabakis told the Salt Lake Tribune that he believes the president‚??s dismal approval rating in his state can be attributed almost exclusively to the Romney factor.

‚??He‚??s part of the tribe for many Utahans,‚?Ě Dabakis said.

But that doesn‚??t explain Obama‚??s low ratings in Wyoming with 28 percent, Alaska with 29 percent and West Virginia and Idaho with 31 percent.

There were 21 states in which the president‚??s approval rating fell between 40 and 50 percent, including some of the largest swing states of Florida (46 percent), Pennsylvania (46 percent) and Ohio (44 percent).

Written By

Audrey Hudson is an award-winning investigative journalist whose enterprise reporting has sparked numerous congressional investigations that led to laws signed by Presidents George W. Bush and Bill Clinton. She won the prestigious Sigma Delta Chi award for Public Service in 2009 for her report on dangerous drug experiments by the federal government on war veterans, which prompted internal investigations and needed reforms within the Veterans Affairs Department. The report also captured first place for investigative reporting by the Washington, D.C. chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists and was a finalist of the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences Webby Awards for news and politics. Her breaking stories have been picked up and followed by major news publications and periodicals, including Readers Digest, Washington Monthly, and The Weekly Standard, as well as The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, USA Today, and Washington Post. With nearly 20 years of experience in Washington as a newspaper reporter and as a Capitol Hill staffer for Western lawmakers, she will now lead Human Events‚?? coverage of energy and environmental issues. A native of Kentucky, Mrs. Hudson has worked inside the Beltway for nearly two decades -- on Capitol Hill as a Senate and House spokeswoman, and most recently at The Washington Times covering Congress, Homeland Security, and the Supreme Court. Audrey‚??s email is AHudson@EaglePub.Co

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Obama polls below 50 percent in 37 states

President Barack Obama’s approval ratings fell below 50 percent in 37 states with his lowest popularity recorded in Utah with 26 percent, according to a new Gallup poll.

‚ÄúThe 50 percent approval mark is significant because post-WWII incumbent presidents who have been above 50 percent job approval on Election Day were easily re-elected,‚ÄĚ said the poll released Wednesday. ‚ÄúPresidents with approval ratings below 50 percent have more uncertain re-election prospects.‚ÄĚ

For example, the poll lists some of the rarities including former Presidents Harry Truman and George W. Bush as two presidents who won with low ratings, and Jimmy Carter, Gerald Ford, and George H.W. Bush as presidents who lost with the low ratings.

The telephone survey was conducted from January to June and included 90,000 adults with a margin of error for individual states of three to eight percent.

Obama was most popular in the District of Columbia with an 83 percent approval rating, followed by Hawaii with 63 percent, Rhode Island with 58 percent, Vermont with 56 percent, and New York, Massachusetts and Maryland with 55 percent.

Utah Democratic Chairman Jim Dabakis told the Salt Lake Tribune that he believes the president’s dismal approval rating in his state can be attributed almost exclusively to the Romney factor.

‚ÄúHe‚Äôs part of the tribe for many Utahans,‚ÄĚ Dabakis said.

But that doesn’t explain Obama’s low ratings in Wyoming with 28 percent, Alaska with 29 percent and West Virginia and Idaho with 31 percent.

There were 21 states in which the president’s approval rating fell between 40 and 50 percent, including some of the largest swing states of Florida (46 percent), Pennsylvania (46 percent) and Ohio (44 percent).

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