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Congress relinquishes its power to approve some presidential appointments

The House Tuesday passed a measure 261-114 to remove 200 presidential appointments from the Senate’s purview for confirmation hearings and votes.

It eliminates the requirement of Senate approval for such positions as rural utility services administrator, board directors of the commodity credit corporation, the assistant administrator for grant programs at FEMA, and assistant secretaries for management.

The bill originated in the Senate last year where it passed 79-20, and reduces the number of confirmations from 1,200 to 1,000.

Rep. Tom Graves (R-Ga.) said he voted against the measure because it was the constitutional duty of the other body to offer its advice and consent on those positions and that the president already controls 2,700 political appointees without congressional overview.

“Time and time again, the Obama administration has shown the American people it’s willing to abuse the power of the Oval Office,” Graves said. “Congress should absolutely not relinquish more power.”

Another position that will be eliminated from approval is the chief scientist of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

The nomination of Scott Doney to be that chief scientist was blocked last year after Sen. David Vitter (R-La.) put a hold on the position because of President Barack Obama’s moratorium on drilling in the Gulf of Mexico. Vitter’s hold ultimately forced Obama to remove Doney from consideration for the position earlier this year

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archive

Congress relinquishes its power to approve some presidential appointments

The bill originated in the Senate last year where it passed 79-20, and reduces the number of confirmations from 1,200 to 1,000.

The House Tuesday passed a measure 261-114 to remove 200 presidential appointments from the Senate??s purview for confirmation hearings and votes.

It eliminates the requirement of Senate approval for such positions as rural utility services administrator, board directors of the commodity credit corporation, the assistant administrator for grant programs at FEMA, and assistant secretaries for management.

The bill originated in the Senate last year where it passed 79-20, and reduces the number of confirmations from 1,200 to 1,000.

Rep. Tom Graves (R-Ga.) said he voted against the measure because it was the constitutional duty of the other body to offer its advice and consent on those positions and that the president already controls 2,700 political appointees without congressional overview.

??Time and time again, the Obama administration has shown the American people it??s willing to abuse the power of the Oval Office,? Graves said. ??Congress should absolutely not relinquish more power.?

Another position that will be eliminated from approval is the chief scientist of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

The nomination of Scott Doney to be that chief scientist was blocked last year after Sen. David Vitter (R-La.) put a hold on the position because of President Barack Obama??s moratorium on drilling in the Gulf of Mexico. Vitter??s hold ultimately forced Obama to remove Doney from consideration for the position earlier this year

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Written By

Audrey Hudson is an award-winning investigative journalist whose enterprise reporting has sparked numerous congressional investigations that led to laws signed by Presidents George W. Bush and Bill Clinton. She won the prestigious Sigma Delta Chi award for Public Service in 2009 for her report on dangerous drug experiments by the federal government on war veterans, which prompted internal investigations and needed reforms within the Veterans Affairs Department. The report also captured first place for investigative reporting by the Washington, D.C. chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists and was a finalist of the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences Webby Awards for news and politics. Her breaking stories have been picked up and followed by major news publications and periodicals, including Readers Digest, Washington Monthly, and The Weekly Standard, as well as The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, USA Today, and Washington Post. With nearly 20 years of experience in Washington as a newspaper reporter and as a Capitol Hill staffer for Western lawmakers, she will now lead Human Events?? coverage of energy and environmental issues. A native of Kentucky, Mrs. Hudson has worked inside the Beltway for nearly two decades -- on Capitol Hill as a Senate and House spokeswoman, and most recently at The Washington Times covering Congress, Homeland Security, and the Supreme Court. Audrey??s email is AHudson@EaglePub.Co

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