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“Muslims Have the Right to Lie in a Good Cause”—Former President of Pakistan

Ben Carson recently created controversy by warning against the Muslim doctrine of taqiyya, which allows Muslims to deceive non-Muslims.  I already addressed the accuracy of Carson’s statements here, and the media’s attempts to discredit him here.

Soon thereafter, Daniel Pipes, the president of the Middle East Forum, brought an interesting anecdote to my attention.

Back in the 1980s, Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq, the president of Pakistan, explained to Ronald Reagan how it was no problem for the Pakistanis to sign the Geneva agreements and yet continue supplying weapons to the Afghan jihadis (“freedom fighters”) combating the Soviet Union.

Why wasn’t it a problem?  According to Zia, “We’ll just lie about it.  That’s what we’ve been doing for eight years.”  He added, “Muslims have the right to lie in a good cause.”  (Click here for source and image of excerpt.)

Compare this casual statement from the president of a Muslim nation with the claims of UCLA’s Abou El Fadl, whom the Washington Post’s Glenn Kessler quoted at length in an effort to prove Carson wrong about taqiyya.  According to the Muslim professor, “there is no concept that would encourage a Muslim to lie to pursue a goal. That is a complete invention.”

So which Muslim do you believe?  The strong and secure Muslim who said that “Muslims have the right to lie in a good cause” — in this case, jihad against “infidels.”  Or the Muslim minority surrounded by American “infidels” who claims that there is “no concept that would encourage a Muslim to lie to pursue a goal”?

Apparently it never occurred to the WaPo’s Kessler that El Fadl himself may have been exercising, in Zia’s words, his Muslim “right to lie in a good cause” — in this case, to prevent Americans from ever being suspicious of Muslim individuals and organizations in the U.S.

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??Muslims Have the Right to Lie in a Good Cause???Former President of Pakistan

Ben Carson recently created controversy by warning against the Muslim doctrine of taqiyya, which allows Muslims to deceive non-Muslims. I already addressed the accuracy of Carson??s statements here, and the media??s attempts to discredit him here.

Ben Carson recently created controversy by warning against the Muslim doctrine of taqiyya, which allows Muslims to deceive non-Muslims.  I already addressed the accuracy of Carson??s statements here, and the media??s attempts to discredit him here.

Soon thereafter, Daniel Pipes, the president of the Middle East Forum, brought an interesting anecdote to my attention.

Back in the 1980s, Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq, the president of Pakistan, explained to Ronald Reagan how it was no problem for the Pakistanis to sign the Geneva agreements and yet continue supplying weapons to the Afghan jihadis (??freedom fighters?) combating the Soviet Union.

Why wasn??t it a problem?  According to Zia, ??We??ll just lie about it.  That??s what we??ve been doing for eight years.?  He added, ??Muslims have the right to lie in a good cause.?  (Click here for source and image of excerpt.)

Compare this casual statement from the president of a Muslim nation with the claims of UCLA??s Abou El Fadl, whom the Washington Post??s Glenn Kessler quoted at length in an effort to prove Carson wrong about taqiyya.  According to the Muslim professor, ??there is no concept that would encourage a Muslim to lie to pursue a goal. That is a complete invention.?

So which Muslim do you believe?  The strong and secure Muslim who said that ??Muslims have the right to lie in a good cause? ?? in this case, jihad against ??infidels.?  Or the Muslim minority surrounded by American ??infidels? who claims that there is ??no concept that would encourage a Muslim to lie to pursue a goal??

Apparently it never occurred to the WaPo??s Kessler that El Fadl himself may have been exercising, in Zia??s words, his Muslim ??right to lie in a good cause? ?? in this case, to prevent Americans from ever being suspicious of Muslim individuals and organizations in the U.S.

Written By

Raymond Ibrahim, a Middle East and Islam specialist, is author of Crucified Again: Exposing Islam??s New War on Christians (2013) and The Al Qaeda Reader (2007). His writings have appeared in a variety of media, including the Los Angeles Times, Washington Times, Jane??s Islamic Affairs Analyst, Middle East Quarterly, World Almanac of Islamism, and Chronicle of Higher Education; he has appeared on MSNBC, Fox News, C-SPAN, PBS, Reuters, Al-Jazeera, NPR, Blaze TV, and CBN. Ibrahim regularly speaks publicly, briefs governmental agencies, provides expert testimony for Islam-related lawsuits, and testifies before Congress. He is a Shillman Fellow at the David Horowitz Freedom Center, a Judith Friedman Rosen Writing Fellow at the Middle East Forum, and a Media Fellow at the Hoover Institution, 2013. Ibrahim??s dual-background??born and raised in the U.S. by Coptic Egyptian parents born and raised in the Middle East??has provided him with unique advantages, from equal fluency in English and Arabic, to an equal understanding of the Western and Middle Eastern mindsets, positioning him to explain the latter to the former.

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