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Television as You Know it is Dying, Long Live the New ‘TV’

By now, most us have abandoned true broadcast television and left our â??rabbit earsâ?ť behind for cable service of one kind or another.

Watching what you used to consider television is about to get a whole lot more interesting. By now, most us have abandoned true broadcast television and left our â??rabbit earsâ?ť behind for cable service of one kind or another. Whether from Comcast (CMCSA), Cox Cable, Charter Communications, Verizon (VZ), AT&T (T) or some other service, these companies have been seeking the holy grail of the triple play — telephony, Internet and TV. If youâ??ve done the math, like I have, it seems most of those companies are practically â??givingâ?ť you the telephony service for free. But if you try to break that bundle, it gets a lot more expensive. Candidly, Iâ??m waiting for a different triple play — mobile voice and data, Internet and TVâ?¦

Recent announcements, however, suggest the triple play, as we know it now, could be over long before we see mobile voice and data, Internet and TV come about. During the last few weeks, announcements from Amazon (AMZN), Yahoo! (YHOO) and Google (GOOGL) all suggest the TV market as we know it is on the cusp of changing. Even without these announcements, youâ??ve probably noticed that the way in which we consume what we once called TV programming has already started to change. It can be watched online via sites like Hulu or on the major networksâ?? websites, streamed through Apple TV or watched later on Netflix (NFLX) or Amazon Instant Video. More and more, the cable companies are making more and more programs available as part of their on-demand service offering.

At the same time, there are more sources of original programming than ever before. Netflix has its â??House of Cards.â?ť AMC Networks (AMCX) has been knocking it out of the park with hits like â??Breaking Badâ?ť and others, while FX Networks, Amazon and now Yahoo! are getting involved. Thatâ??s the content side of the equation, and thatâ??s not even counting some of the channels that Googleâ??s YouTube has created.

Read more about the rise of the new “TV” at Eagle Daily Investor.

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Written By

Chris Versace is a financial columnist and equity analyst with more than 18 years of experience in the investment industry. He has been ranked an All Star Analyst by Zacks Investment Research and his efforts in analyzing industries, companies and equity securities have been recognized by both Institutional Investor and Thomson Reutersâ?? StarMine Monitor. Heâ??s frequently published in The Washington Times and is a frequent contributor to the daily radio show â??Americaâ??s Morning Newsâ?ť and â??Americaâ??s Radio Newsâ?ť. He has been quoted in the Wall Street Journal, Investorâ??s Business Daily, The Street, USA Today and other publications. In addition, he can be frequently seen on televisionâ??s â??Fox Businessâ?ť show.

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archive

Television as You Know it is Dying, Long Live the New ‘TV’

Watching what you used to consider television is about to get a whole lot more interesting. By now, most us have abandoned true broadcast television and left our “rabbit ears” behind for cable service of one kind or another. Whether from Comcast (CMCSA), Cox Cable, Charter Communications, Verizon (VZ), AT&T (T) or some other service, these companies have been seeking the holy grail of the triple play — telephony, Internet and TV. If you’ve done the math, like I have, it seems most of those companies are practically “giving” you the telephony service for free. But if you try to break that bundle, it gets a lot more expensive. Candidly, I’m waiting for a different triple play — mobile voice and data, Internet and TV…

Recent announcements, however, suggest the triple play, as we know it now, could be over long before we see mobile voice and data, Internet and TV come about. During the last few weeks, announcements from Amazon (AMZN), Yahoo! (YHOO) and Google (GOOGL) all suggest the TV market as we know it is on the cusp of changing. Even without these announcements, you’ve probably noticed that the way in which we consume what we once called TV programming has already started to change. It can be watched online via sites like Hulu or on the major networks’ websites, streamed through Apple TV or watched later on Netflix (NFLX) or Amazon Instant Video. More and more, the cable companies are making more and more programs available as part of their on-demand service offering.

At the same time, there are more sources of original programming than ever before. Netflix has its “House of Cards.” AMC Networks (AMCX) has been knocking it out of the park with hits like “Breaking Bad” and others, while FX Networks, Amazon and now Yahoo! are getting involved. That’s the content side of the equation, and that’s not even counting some of the channels that Google’s YouTube has created.

Read more about the rise of the new “TV” at Eagle Daily Investor.

Newsletter Signup.

Sign up to the Human Events newsletter

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