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Obama wants short-term fix on sequester

President Barack Obama called on Congress to agree to temporary spending cuts to avoid sequestration Tuesday, agreeing that “the full budget may not be finished before March 1.”

But much of the rhetoric in his nine-minute remarks this afternoon had been heard from both Obama and Press Secretary Jay Carney about the debt ceiling right up to when lawmakers agreed to its temporary extension earlier this year.

“We just can’t cut our way to prosperity,” Obama said, referring to the automatic cuts without accompanying tax increases for higher wage earners, “It’s not the right thing to do to the economy.”

In again insisting he has accepted a “balanced mixed” of spending cuts and that he supports what he called “sensible reform to Medicare and other entitlements,” Obama also said they must “go hand in hand with tax reform”—an obvious reference to taxes going up once more on the highest wage earners.

Earlier in the day, Speaker of the House John Boehner (R-Ohio) made it clear House Republicans would not go along with another tax increase.

“We believe there is a better way to reduce the deficit, but Americans do not support sacrificing real spending cuts for more tax hikes.  The president’s sequester should be replaced with spending cuts and reforms that will start us on the path to balancing the budget in 10 years,” Boehner said in a statement.

The sequester, which Obama first proposed, would heavily cut defense spending, with many military officials, government defense contractors and small businesses with ties to the defense industry, already laying off staff in anticipation for even more cutbacks.

“Our economy right now is headed in the right direction and it will stay that way as long as there aren’t any more self-inflicted wounds coming out of Washington,” Obama said.

 

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Obama wants short-term fix on sequester

The president called on Congress to pass a quick-fix solution.

President Barack Obama called on Congress to agree to temporary spending cuts to avoid sequestration Tuesday, agreeing that ??the full budget may not be finished before March 1.”

But much of the rhetoric in his nine-minute remarks this afternoon had been heard from both Obama and Press Secretary Jay Carney about the debt ceiling right up to when lawmakers agreed to its temporary extension earlier this year.

??We just can??t cut our way to prosperity,? Obama said, referring to the automatic cuts without accompanying tax increases for higher wage earners, ??It??s not the right thing to do to the economy.”

In again insisting he has accepted a ??balanced mixed? of spending cuts and that he supports what he called ??sensible reform to Medicare and other entitlements,? Obama also said they must ??go hand in hand with tax reform???an obvious reference to taxes going up once more on the highest wage earners.

Earlier in the day, Speaker of the House John Boehner (R-Ohio) made it clear House Republicans would not go along with another tax increase.

“We believe there is a better way to reduce the deficit, but Americans do not support sacrificing real spending cuts for more tax hikes.  The president??s sequester should be replaced with spending cuts and reforms that will start us on the path to balancing the budget in 10 years,” Boehner said in a statement.

The sequester, which Obama first proposed, would heavily cut defense spending, with many military officials, government defense contractors and small businesses with ties to the defense industry, already laying off staff in anticipation for even more cutbacks.

“Our economy right now is headed in the right direction and it will stay that way as long as there aren’t any more self-inflicted wounds coming out of Washington,” Obama said.

 

Written By

John Gizzi has come to be known as ??the man who knows everyone in Washington? and, indeed, many of those who hold elected positions and in party leadership roles throughout the United States. With his daily access to the White House as a correspondent, Mr. Gizzi offers readers the inside scoop on what??s going on in the nation??s capital. He is the author of a number of popular Human Events features, such as ??Gizzi on Politics? and spotlights of key political races around the country. Gizzi also is the host of ??Gizzi??s America,? video interviews that appear on HumanEvents.com. Gizzi got his start at Human Events in 1979 after graduating from Fairfield University in Connecticut and then working for the Travis County (Tex.) Tax Assessor. He has appeared on hundreds of radio and TV shows, including Fox News Channel, C-SPAN, America's Voice,The Jim Bohannon Show, Fox 5, WUSA 9, America's Radio News Network and is also a frequent contributor to the BBC -- and has appeared on France24 TV and German Radio. He is a past president of the Georgetown Kiwanis Club, past member of the St. Matthew's Cathedral's Parish Council, and secretary of the West End Friends of the Library. He is a recipient of the William A. Rusher Award for Journalistic Excellence and was named Journalist of the Year by the Conservative Political Action Conference in 2002. John Gizzi is also a credentialed correspondent at the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. He has questioned two IMF managing directors, Dominique Strauss-Kahn and Christine LaGarde, and has become friends with international correspondents worldwide. John??s email is JGizzi@EaglePub.Com

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