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New law turns down the volume on TV commercials

??This is a common sense approach to a problem that plagues individuals across the nation and will create a more enjoyable television experience,? says Sen. Roger Wicker.

THERE IS NO NEED TO ADJUST THE VOLUME ON YOUR TELEVISION SET.

Not anymore. Beginning today, the Commercial Advertisement Loudness Mitigation Act (CALM) passed by two years ago by Congress finally goes into effect.

That means, under threat from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), the audio on TV commercials cannot be broadcast at louder levels than the accompanying program.

The law was authored by Sen. Roger Wicker (R-Miss.) who argued that excessively loud commercials were just plain annoying and drove families away from quality television programming.

??This is a common sense approach to a problem that plagues individuals across the nation and will create a more enjoyable television experience,? Wicker said today.

The new law also allows viewers to report violations directly to the FCC via its web site.

Written By

Audrey Hudson is an award-winning investigative journalist whose enterprise reporting has sparked numerous congressional investigations that led to laws signed by Presidents George W. Bush and Bill Clinton. She won the prestigious Sigma Delta Chi award for Public Service in 2009 for her report on dangerous drug experiments by the federal government on war veterans, which prompted internal investigations and needed reforms within the Veterans Affairs Department. The report also captured first place for investigative reporting by the Washington, D.C. chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists and was a finalist of the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences Webby Awards for news and politics. Her breaking stories have been picked up and followed by major news publications and periodicals, including Readers Digest, Washington Monthly, and The Weekly Standard, as well as The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, USA Today, and Washington Post. With nearly 20 years of experience in Washington as a newspaper reporter and as a Capitol Hill staffer for Western lawmakers, she will now lead Human Events?? coverage of energy and environmental issues. A native of Kentucky, Mrs. Hudson has worked inside the Beltway for nearly two decades -- on Capitol Hill as a Senate and House spokeswoman, and most recently at The Washington Times covering Congress, Homeland Security, and the Supreme Court. Audrey??s email is AHudson@EaglePub.Co

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archive

New law turns down the volume on TV commercials

THERE IS NO NEED TO ADJUST THE VOLUME ON YOUR TELEVISION SET.

Not anymore. Beginning today, the Commercial Advertisement Loudness Mitigation Act (CALM) passed by two years ago by Congress finally goes into effect.

That means, under threat from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), the audio on TV commercials cannot be broadcast at louder levels than the accompanying program.

The law was authored by Sen. Roger Wicker (R-Miss.) who argued that excessively loud commercials were just plain annoying and drove families away from quality television programming.

“This is a common sense approach to a problem that plagues individuals across the nation and will create a more enjoyable television experience,” Wicker said today.

The new law also allows viewers to report violations directly to the FCC via its web site.

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