Connect with us

archive

Romney: Hope is not a strategy

In a much-anticipated foreign policy speech Republican presidential challenger Mitt Romney at the Virginia Military Institute Monday morning, Romney focused heavily on White House mismanagement of affairs in the Middle East, promising that he would hold hostile nations more accountable and give support to those struggling under oppressive regimes.

Romney’s searing indictment of the administration’s failures capitalized on U.S. ineffectiveness at stopping nuclear advancement in Iran and the misinformation and botched handling of the aftermath of an attack in Benghazi, Libya last month that left four Americans dead. He made clear that he did not buy President Barack Obama’s repeated claim that the attacks were a reaction to an American-made amateur film satirizing the Islamic religion.

‚ÄúThe attack on our Consulate in Benghazi on September 11th, 2012 was likely the work of forces affiliated with those that attacked our homeland on September 11th, 2001,‚ÄĚ he said. ‚ÄúThis latest assault cannot be blamed on a reprehensible video insulting Islam, despite the administration‚Äôs attempts to convince us of that for so long.‚ÄĚ

Moreover, Romney said, the attacks were a symptom of a fault line running through the Middle East, where a dark and violent ideology struggles for supremacy over those who yearn for freedom and independence.

He faulted Obama for failing to stand with the latter.

‚Äú…when millions of Iranians took to the streets in June of 2009, when they demanded freedom from a cruel regime that threatens the world, when they cried out, ‚ÄėAre you with us, or are you with them?‚Äô‚ÄĒthe American President was silent,‚ÄĚ he said.

Romney promised to arm the Syrian opposition to the oppressive Assad regime and support the efforts of the Libyan people to established a free government, while putting the nation of Iran on notice and attaching clear conditions for U.S. aid to countries like Egypt, where civil rights are still being suppressed by new leadership.

‚ÄúI know the President hopes for a safer, freer, and a more prosperous Middle East allied with the United States,‚ÄĚ he said. ‚ÄúI share this hope. But hope is not a strategy.‚ÄĚ

Advertisement
Advertisement

TRENDING NOW:

THE TRUTH ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING: REAL THREAT OR HYSTERIA?

archive

Dystopia Alert: A Decimating National Debt

archive

Guest Columnist: Why We Must Have a Border Wall

archive

Rising Social Agenda Brings Luster to Qualified Dividends

archive

archive

Romney: Hope is not a strategy

The Republican nominee‚??s searing indictment of Obama‚??s failures capitalized on the administration’s ineffectiveness at stopping nuclear advancement in Iran and the misinformation in the aftermath of an attack in Benghazi.

In a much-anticipated foreign policy speech Republican presidential challenger Mitt Romney at the Virginia Military Institute Monday morning, Romney focused heavily on White House mismanagement of affairs in the Middle East, promising that he would hold hostile nations more accountable and give support to those struggling under oppressive regimes.

Romney‚??s searing indictment of the administration‚??s failures capitalized on U.S. ineffectiveness at stopping nuclear advancement in Iran and the misinformation and botched handling of the aftermath of an attack in Benghazi, Libya last month that left four Americans dead. He made clear that he did not buy President Barack Obama‚??s repeated claim that the attacks were a reaction to an American-made amateur film satirizing the Islamic religion.

‚??The attack on our Consulate in Benghazi on September 11th, 2012 was likely the work of forces affiliated with those that attacked our homeland on September 11th, 2001,‚?Ě he said. ‚??This latest assault cannot be blamed on a reprehensible video insulting Islam, despite the administration‚??s attempts to convince us of that for so long.‚?Ě

Moreover, Romney said, the attacks were a symptom of a fault line running through the Middle East, where a dark and violent ideology struggles for supremacy over those who yearn for freedom and independence.

He faulted Obama for failing to stand with the latter.

‚??…when millions of Iranians took to the streets in June of 2009, when they demanded freedom from a cruel regime that threatens the world, when they cried out, ‚??Are you with us, or are you with them?‚??‚??the American President was silent,‚?Ě he said.

Romney promised to arm the Syrian opposition to the oppressive Assad regime and support the efforts of the Libyan people to established a free government, while putting the nation of Iran on notice and attaching clear conditions for U.S. aid to countries like Egypt, where civil rights are still being suppressed by new leadership.

‚??I know the President hopes for a safer, freer, and a more prosperous Middle East allied with the United States,‚?Ě he said. ‚??I share this hope. But hope is not a strategy.‚?Ě

Written By

Hope Hodge first covered military issues for the Daily News of Jacksonville, N.C., where her beat included the sprawling Marine Corps base, Camp Lejeune. During her two years at the paper, she received investigative reporting awards for exposing a former Marine who was using faked military awards to embezzle disability pay from the government and for breaking news about the popularity of the designer drug Spice in the ranks. Her work has also appeared in The American Spectator, New York Sun, WORLD Magazine, and The Washington Post. Hodge was born near Boston, Mass., where she grew up as a lover of Revolutionary War history and fall foliage. She also discovered a love of politics and policy as a grassroots volunteer and activist on Beacon Hill. She graduated in 2009 with a degree in Politics, Philosophy, and Economics from The King's College in New York City, where she served as editor-in-chief of her school newspaper and worked as a teaching assistant when not freelancing or using student discounts to see Broadway shows. Hope‚??s email is HHodge@eaglepub.com

TRENDING NOW:

Connect