Connect with us

archive

The Mayors’ convention

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — One of the more intriguing side stories of the Democratic National Convention was the presence at and role in the party conclave by big city mayors. Julian Castro, mayor of San Antonio, Texas, won the convention’s heart with his keynote address. Charlotte Mayor Anthony Foxx, also considered one of his party’s future leaders, was a key player in bringing the convention to the Tarheel State and delivered the welcoming address.

All told, six mayors had high-profile speaking roles at Barack Obama’s convention, with Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa serving as convention chairman.

The conclusion of political pundits on all sides was almost universal: following the shellacking the Democratic Party took in midterm elections for Congress and statehouses in 2010, it is very likely that City Hall will produce the next crop of national Democratic leaders after Obama. The 37-year-old Castro is already being groomed as a potential Democratic candidate for governor or U.S. Senator from Texas. Several Republicans — notably U.S. Senate nominee Ted Cruz — have warned that with the growing population of Hispanics in the Lone Star State, a Republican failure to cultivate this group could lead Texas to return to its Democratic patterns of a generation ago.

Newark Mayor Cory Booker, who chaired the convention Platform Committee, has shown his independent side by defending Mitt Romney’s business career and voicing support for school vouchers and other fresh approaches to public education. But Booker also presided over the crafting of a decidedly left-of-center party platform, is forgiven these “apostasies” by most Democratic leaders, who see him as a candidate for governor or senator from the Garden State before the decade is out.

Also on hand for a fighting speech was Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel. No talk of governor or senator soon for this Democrat, who was on the White House staff corps of the men he calls “two great presidents” (Clinton and Obama). Betting was strong at the convention center that, whatever happens to Obama this fall, Emmanuel will try to move from City Hall to the White House in 2016.

Newsletter Signup.

Sign up to the Human Events newsletter

Advertisement
Advertisement

TRENDING NOW:

YouTube Won’t Let You Watch Lauren Southern’s ‘Borderless’

FOREIGN AFFAIRS

DONKTUM: Restricting the Range of Consciousness.

CULTURE

Lauren Southern’s Borderless Deleted By YouTube. ENOUGH.

U.S. POLITICS

Farage: ‘No No to BoJo’.

FOREIGN AFFAIRS

5 things Romney's announcement says about his potential campaign

archive

The Mayors?? convention

Following the devastating 2010 midterm elections for Congress and statehouses, it is very likely that City Hall will produce the next crop of national Democratic leaders after Obama.

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — One of the more intriguing side stories of the Democratic National Convention was the presence at and role in the party conclave by big city mayors. Julian Castro, mayor of San Antonio, Texas, won the convention??s heart with his keynote address. Charlotte Mayor Anthony Foxx, also considered one of his party??s future leaders, was a key player in bringing the convention to the Tarheel State and delivered the welcoming address.

All told, six mayors had high-profile speaking roles at Barack Obama??s convention, with Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa serving as convention chairman.

The conclusion of political pundits on all sides was almost universal: following the shellacking the Democratic Party took in midterm elections for Congress and statehouses in 2010, it is very likely that City Hall will produce the next crop of national Democratic leaders after Obama. The 37-year-old Castro is already being groomed as a potential Democratic candidate for governor or U.S. Senator from Texas. Several Republicans — notably U.S. Senate nominee Ted Cruz — have warned that with the growing population of Hispanics in the Lone Star State, a Republican failure to cultivate this group could lead Texas to return to its Democratic patterns of a generation ago.

Newark Mayor Cory Booker, who chaired the convention Platform Committee, has shown his independent side by defending Mitt Romney??s business career and voicing support for school vouchers and other fresh approaches to public education. But Booker also presided over the crafting of a decidedly left-of-center party platform, is forgiven these ??apostasies? by most Democratic leaders, who see him as a candidate for governor or senator from the Garden State before the decade is out.

Also on hand for a fighting speech was Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel. No talk of governor or senator soon for this Democrat, who was on the White House staff corps of the men he calls ??two great presidents? (Clinton and Obama). Betting was strong at the convention center that, whatever happens to Obama this fall, Emmanuel will try to move from City Hall to the White House in 2016.

Newsletter Signup.

Sign up to the Human Events newsletter

Written By

John Gizzi has come to be known as ??the man who knows everyone in Washington? and, indeed, many of those who hold elected positions and in party leadership roles throughout the United States. With his daily access to the White House as a correspondent, Mr. Gizzi offers readers the inside scoop on what??s going on in the nation??s capital. He is the author of a number of popular Human Events features, such as ??Gizzi on Politics? and spotlights of key political races around the country. Gizzi also is the host of ??Gizzi??s America,? video interviews that appear on HumanEvents.com. Gizzi got his start at Human Events in 1979 after graduating from Fairfield University in Connecticut and then working for the Travis County (Tex.) Tax Assessor. He has appeared on hundreds of radio and TV shows, including Fox News Channel, C-SPAN, America's Voice,The Jim Bohannon Show, Fox 5, WUSA 9, America's Radio News Network and is also a frequent contributor to the BBC -- and has appeared on France24 TV and German Radio. He is a past president of the Georgetown Kiwanis Club, past member of the St. Matthew's Cathedral's Parish Council, and secretary of the West End Friends of the Library. He is a recipient of the William A. Rusher Award for Journalistic Excellence and was named Journalist of the Year by the Conservative Political Action Conference in 2002. John Gizzi is also a credentialed correspondent at the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. He has questioned two IMF managing directors, Dominique Strauss-Kahn and Christine LaGarde, and has become friends with international correspondents worldwide. John??s email is JGizzi@EaglePub.Com

TRENDING NOW:

YouTube Won’t Let You Watch Lauren Southern’s ‘Borderless’

FOREIGN AFFAIRS

DONKTUM: Restricting the Range of Consciousness.

CULTURE

Lauren Southern’s Borderless Deleted By YouTube. ENOUGH.

U.S. POLITICS

Farage: ‘No No to BoJo’.

FOREIGN AFFAIRS

Connect
Newsletter Signup.

Sign up to the Human Events newsletter