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Obama campaign plans broadside against Romney’s foreign policy

Obama’s foreign policy advisers accuse Romney of weak strategy ideas and remaining “stuck in the Cold War.”

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — The Obama campaign is very likely to launch a full-scale broadside against Mitt Romney on the issues of national security and foreign policy, insisting that the Republican nominee is vague on specifics and ??stuck in the Cold War.?

Along with convincing U.S. voters to stick with their man as commander-in-chief, ??Team Obama? also made it clear at the Democratic National Convention that they want to cultivate foreign audiences with this ??stick with what you have? tactic. A special briefing by the Obama camp was held on Tuesday at the Foreign Press Center, including Michele Flournoy, former Undersecretary of Defense for Policy and now an adviser to Obama for America; Colin Kahl, former senior Pentagon official and Obama for America adviser; and Marie Harf, Associate Policy Director for National Security at Obama for America.

??Mitt Romney has failed to lay out what he would do as commander-in-chief,? Flournoy told reporters, adding that some of the Republican nominee??s foreign policy stances are ??extreme.?

She noted that, in his two major foreign policy addresses so far, Romney ??failed to mention al-Qaeda? and, she said, he is the first major party nominee for president ??in 60 years not to mention an ongoing war in his acceptance speech.? Flournoy was referring to Afghanistan and said it was ??tragic? Romney has failed to tell so far how he would end the war there.

In what is sure to be a line repeated on the campaign trail often in the weeks ahead, Flournoy told the correspondents she was sure they remembered Romney??s trip to Europe earlier this year and how ??it didn??t go so well.?

Decrying what she dubbed as Romney being ??stuck in the Cold War,? Flournoy charged that he has addressed China and Russia ??in Cold War terms, failing to recognize how we must work with these countries on issues such as Iran.?

The cultivation of foreign press by U.S. presidential campaigns and the desired goal of convincing world leaders to say they are satisfied with the president they know is nothing new. In 1992, then-British Prime Minister John Major publicly said he wanted President George H.W. Bush re-elected over Bill Clinton. Major??s successor, Tony Blair of the Labour Party, made little secret of his preference for Clinton??s re-election in ??96 and that of Republican George H.W. Bush in 2004. That same year, however, French President Jacques Chirac sent out strong signals he wanted Democrat John Kerry instead of Bush in the White House.

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John Gizzi has come to be known as ??the man who knows everyone in Washington? and, indeed, many of those who hold elected positions and in party leadership roles throughout the United States. With his daily access to the White House as a correspondent, Mr. Gizzi offers readers the inside scoop on what??s going on in the nation??s capital. He is the author of a number of popular Human Events features, such as ??Gizzi on Politics? and spotlights of key political races around the country. Gizzi also is the host of ??Gizzi??s America,? video interviews that appear on HumanEvents.com. Gizzi got his start at Human Events in 1979 after graduating from Fairfield University in Connecticut and then working for the Travis County (Tex.) Tax Assessor. He has appeared on hundreds of radio and TV shows, including Fox News Channel, C-SPAN, America's Voice,The Jim Bohannon Show, Fox 5, WUSA 9, America's Radio News Network and is also a frequent contributor to the BBC -- and has appeared on France24 TV and German Radio. He is a past president of the Georgetown Kiwanis Club, past member of the St. Matthew's Cathedral's Parish Council, and secretary of the West End Friends of the Library. He is a recipient of the William A. Rusher Award for Journalistic Excellence and was named Journalist of the Year by the Conservative Political Action Conference in 2002. John Gizzi is also a credentialed correspondent at the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. He has questioned two IMF managing directors, Dominique Strauss-Kahn and Christine LaGarde, and has become friends with international correspondents worldwide. John??s email is JGizzi@EaglePub.Com

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archive

Obama campaign plans broadside against Romney’s foreign policy

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — The Obama campaign is very likely to launch a full-scale broadside against Mitt Romney on the issues of national security and foreign policy, insisting that the Republican nominee is vague on specifics and “stuck in the Cold War.”

Along with convincing U.S. voters to stick with their man as commander-in-chief, “Team Obama” also made it clear at the Democratic National Convention that they want to cultivate foreign audiences with this “stick with what you have” tactic. A special briefing by the Obama camp was held on Tuesday at the Foreign Press Center, including Michele Flournoy, former Undersecretary of Defense for Policy and now an adviser to Obama for America; Colin Kahl, former senior Pentagon official and Obama for America adviser; and Marie Harf, Associate Policy Director for National Security at Obama for America.

“Mitt Romney has failed to lay out what he would do as commander-in-chief,” Flournoy told reporters, adding that some of the Republican nominee’s foreign policy stances are “extreme.”

She noted that, in his two major foreign policy addresses so far, Romney “failed to mention al-Qaeda” and, she said, he is the first major party nominee for president “in 60 years not to mention an ongoing war in his acceptance speech.” Flournoy was referring to Afghanistan and said it was “tragic” Romney has failed to tell so far how he would end the war there.

In what is sure to be a line repeated on the campaign trail often in the weeks ahead, Flournoy told the correspondents she was sure they remembered Romney’s trip to Europe earlier this year and how “it didn’t go so well.”

Decrying what she dubbed as Romney being “stuck in the Cold War,” Flournoy charged that he has addressed China and Russia “in Cold War terms, failing to recognize how we must work with these countries on issues such as Iran.”

The cultivation of foreign press by U.S. presidential campaigns and the desired goal of convincing world leaders to say they are satisfied with the president they know is nothing new. In 1992, then-British Prime Minister John Major publicly said he wanted President George H.W. Bush re-elected over Bill Clinton. Major’s successor, Tony Blair of the Labour Party, made little secret of his preference for Clinton’s re-election in ’96 and that of Republican George H.W. Bush in 2004. That same year, however, French President Jacques Chirac sent out strong signals he wanted Democrat John Kerry instead of Bush in the White House.

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