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This week in Congress: Farm bill, Holder vote

The House is in session, and the Senate will continue working on the Farm Bill — a measure by Sen. Inhofe that would overturn the EPA‚??s Utility MACT is also up for a vote.

Attorney General Eric Holder will potentially face contempt of Congress charges Wednesday as the House panel investigating the Fast and Furious scandal casts the first votes to begin the process.

Republican leaders have yet to schedule a floor vote by the full House, but have threatened to do so if Holder does not comply with a subpoena to produce documents. The contempt citation is for obstructing the ongoing investigation.

‚??Assuming Attorney General Holder continues to stonewall, we will have no choice but to hold him in contempt for his failure to provide the documents necessary to prevent a tragedy like this from happening again,‚?Ě said House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-Va.).

Meanwhile, the full House will vote on the Conservation and Economic Growth Act, a package of 14 bills that passed through the Natural Resources Committee that supporters say will also create new jobs, strengthen the economy and protect the environment.

The bill includes a measure to restore pedestrian and vehicle access to the Cape Hatteras National Seashore in North Carolina, miles of which were closed by the federal government this spring to protect a nesting bird at the cost of jobs at the summer destination.

Language included by a Democrat would also allow firearms and archery equipment for target practice on federal lands, previously closed off by federal land managers.

The Senate will continue working on the Farm Bill, and once that is complete will turn their attention to the Flood Insurance Bill. A Senate vote is also expected on a measure by Sen. James Inhofe (R-Okla.) that would overturn the EPA‚??s Utility MACT rule that critics say will shutter coal plants across the country.

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Audrey Hudson is an award-winning investigative journalist whose enterprise reporting has sparked numerous congressional investigations that led to laws signed by Presidents George W. Bush and Bill Clinton. She won the prestigious Sigma Delta Chi award for Public Service in 2009 for her report on dangerous drug experiments by the federal government on war veterans, which prompted internal investigations and needed reforms within the Veterans Affairs Department. The report also captured first place for investigative reporting by the Washington, D.C. chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists and was a finalist of the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences Webby Awards for news and politics. Her breaking stories have been picked up and followed by major news publications and periodicals, including Readers Digest, Washington Monthly, and The Weekly Standard, as well as The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, USA Today, and Washington Post. With nearly 20 years of experience in Washington as a newspaper reporter and as a Capitol Hill staffer for Western lawmakers, she will now lead Human Events‚?? coverage of energy and environmental issues. A native of Kentucky, Mrs. Hudson has worked inside the Beltway for nearly two decades -- on Capitol Hill as a Senate and House spokeswoman, and most recently at The Washington Times covering Congress, Homeland Security, and the Supreme Court. Audrey‚??s email is AHudson@EaglePub.Co

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