SEARCH ALL ARTICLES BY Thomas Smith, Jr.:
Mr. Smith is a contributor to Human Events. A former U.S. Marine rifle-squad leader and counterterrorism instructor, he writes about military/defense issues and has covered conflict in the Balkans, on the West Bank, in Iraq and Lebanon. He is the author of six books, and his articles appear in a variety of publications. E-mail him at marine1@uswriter.com.

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RECENT ARTICLES

  • S.C. lawyer a world-class adventurer

                                                          Lt. Col. Thomas Stowe Mullikin In 1912 an advertisement placed by British explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton appeared in a London newspaper, appealing to “Men wanted for hazardous journey. Low wages, bitter cold, long hours of complete darkness. Safe return | Read More »

  • This Week In American Military History

    Dec. 11, 1941:  Four days after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, isolated and embattled U.S. Marines – and a few good sailors, soldiers, and civilian contractors – put up a heroic defense of Wake Island in the Pacific, beating | Read More »

  • This Week In American Military History

    Dec. 11, 1941: Four days after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, isolated and embattled U.S. Marines – and a few good sailors, soldiers, and civilian contractors – put up a heroic defense of Wake Island in the Pacific, beating back an attempted Japanese landing with heavy losses to the enemy.

  • This Week In American Military History

    Dec. 7, 1941: Japanese Naval air forces strike Pearl Harbor (Oahu, Hawaii), the main U.S. Naval base there, the anchored American fleet, and an Army airfield in a tactically successful albeit strategically ruinous "sneak attack" that will fully thrust America into World War II.

  • This Week in American Military History

    Nov. 27, 1950: The Battle of Chosin Reservoir opens when the Chinese 9th Army Group – four armies under the command of Gen. Song Shilun – surge across the Yalu River into Korea and attack numerically inferior U.S. Marine and Army forces.

  • Intel Experts: CIA Penetration by Terrorist Group is ‘Catastrophic’

    Hizballah “makes Al Qaeda look like a minor league team.”

  • This Week in American Military History

    This Week in American Military History: Nov. 23, 1863:  The battles of the Chattanooga campaign begin between newly appointed commander of the Western armies, Union Maj. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, and Confederate Gen. Braxton Bragg, yes, Fort Bragg, N.C. is | Read More »

  • This Week In American Military History: From Guadalcanal to Second Fallujah

    Nov. 12, 1912: Nearly three years to the day before Lt. Commander Henry Mustin becomes the first American to make a catapult launch from a ship underway, Lt. Theodore Gordon Ellyson makes the first successful aircraft catapult launch in Naval aviation history.

  • This Week In American Military History: From a Corps of Marines to the Corps of Discovery

    This Week In American Military History

  • This Week in American Military History: From Tippecanoe to Roosevelt’s Patrol

    Oct. 31, 1972: U.S. Navy SEAL Petty Officer (future lieutenant) Michael E. Thornton; his commanding officer, Lt. Thomas R. Norris; and three South Vietnamese Naval commandos are conducting an intelligence-collection and prisoner-snatch operation deep behind enemy lines when they are discovered by a force that outnumbers them at least 10 to one…

  • This Week In American Military History

    Excerpt: The frigate USS United States under the command of Capt. (future commodore) Stephen Decatur – hero of Tripoli and said to be the U.S. Navy’s own Lord Nelson – captures the Royal Navy frigate HMS Macedonian under the command of Capt. John Carden in a brisk fight several hundred miles off the Azores.

  • October Marks an Important Anniversary of the War On Terror

    Just as we commemorated the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks against our nation (the worst complex terrorist attack in world history), this month – specifically Oct. 23 – marks the 28th anniversary of the worst terrorist attack against us to date in 1983.

  • This Week In American Military History

      This Week in American Military History: Oct. 11, 1942: The battle of Cape Esperance (also known as the Second Battle of Savo Island) opens between U.S. Naval forces under the command of Rear Admiral Norman Scott and Japanese Naval | Read More »

  • This Week in American Military History

    Sept. 18, 1947:  Happy Birthday, U.S. Air Force!  America’s air and space warfare service (and the descendent service of the U.S. Army Air Forces), the U.S. Air Force becomes an independent and equal arm of the American military. Sept. 19, | Read More »

  • Sept. 11 Attacks Less A Seminal Event, Rather An Awakening

    This is the 10th anniversary of what some have said is a seminal event in our national history.  I would argue it was less a seminal event, and more an awakening as to the danger posed to the West since the | Read More »

  • This Week in American Military History

    Sept. 11, 1777:  British forces under the command of Gen. William Howe decisively defeat Continental forces under Gen. George Washington. Though a British victory, Howe is stunned by the tenacity and resistance of his American foe. Sept. 11, 1814:  American | Read More »

  • This Week in American Military History:

    The “Turtle” submarine designed by David Bushnell Sept. 7, 1776:  Just before dawn, an odd-looking barrel-shaped craft silently makes its way down the Hudson River from Manhattan toward a British warship, HMS Eagle, anchored in New York Harbor. The craft, | Read More »

  • This Week in American Military History:

    Lt. Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson, C.S.A.  Aug. 28, 1862:  The Second battle of Bull Run (known to many Southerners as Second Manassas) opens between Union Army forces under the command of Maj. Gen. John Pope and Confederate forces under | Read More »

  • This Week in American Military History

    Aug. 21, 1863: Confederate guerrillas under the command of William Clark Quantrill (operating outside the control of regular Confederate forces) launch a bloody raid on Lawrence, Kansas.

    Quantrill – who purportedly once served in the Missouri State Guard – is widely considered a brigand and a cutthroat. That reputation continues today. To some, however, he remains a folk hero.

  • America Loses a Giant, South Carolina loses a Friend

    Col. Charles P. Murray Jr. Col. Charles P. Murray Jr., U.S. Army (Ret.) – a recipient of the Medal of Honor, a fellow South Carolinian and friend – passed away Friday, Aug. 12, 2011. He would have been 90 in | Read More »