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George F. Will is one of the most widely recognized, and widely read, writers in the world. With more than 450 newspapers, his biweekly Newsweek column, and his appearances as a political commentator on ABC, Will may be the most influential writer in America.
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RECENT ARTICLES

  • Amtrak’s For-Profit Regulation

    Amtrak’s For-Profit Regulation

    In 1906, Leonor Loree, an accomplished railroad executive, examined the dilapidated Kansas City Southern Railroad that he had been hired to rehabilitate.

  • Who Will Follow Trump Off the Cliff?

    Who Will Follow Trump Off the Cliff?

    Parsing Trump sentences is a challenge but is rewarding because it frequently reveals that he actually has said nothing at all.

  • Treasury’s Fannie and Freddie rip-off

    Treasury’s Fannie and Freddie rip-off

    Gigantic government’s complexity and opacity provide innumerable opportunities for opportunists to act unconstrained by clear law or effective supervision.

  • The Libya Debacle Undermines Clinton’s Foreign Policy Credentials

    The Libya Debacle Undermines Clinton’s Foreign Policy Credentials

    Republican peculiarities in this political season are so numerous and lurid that insufficient attention is being paid to this: The probable Democratic nominee’s principal credential, her service as secretary of state, is undermined by a debacle of remarkable dishonesty.

  • Why the Future is Going to Disappoint Us

    Why the Future is Going to Disappoint Us

    Presidential campaigns incite both hypochondria and euphoria, portraying the present as grimmer than it is and the future as grander than it can be.

  • The Albatross of a Trump Endorsement

    The Albatross of a Trump Endorsement

    Donald Trump’s distinctive rhetorical style — think of a drunk with a bullhorn reading aloud James Joyce’s “Finnegans Wake” under water — poses an almost insuperable challenge to people whose painful duty is to try to extract clarity from his effusions.

  • How to Cool Down Trump

    How to Cool Down Trump

    “Hell,” said Alabama’s Democratic Gov. George Wallace before roiling the 1968 presidential race, “we got too much dignity in government now, what we need is some meanness .”

  • Donald Trump Relishes Wrecking the GOP

    Donald Trump Relishes Wrecking the GOP

    Lyndon Johnson simply was exasperated. Barack Obama’s mischief was methodical.

  • The Legislative and Judicial Branches Strike Back Against Obama's Overreach

    The Legislative and Judicial Branches Strike Back Against Obama’s Overreach

    Barack Obama’s Wilsonian hostility to the separation of powers, expressed in his executive authoritarianism, is provoking equal and opposite reactions from the judicial and legislative branches.

  • Why Antonin Scalia was a Jurist of Colossal Consequence

    Why Antonin Scalia was a Jurist of Colossal Consequence

    Antonin Scalia, who combined a zest for intellectual combat with a vast talent for friendship, was a Roman candle of sparkling jurisprudential theories leavened by acerbic witticisms.

  • Progressives' Anti-Free Speech Itch

    Progressives’ Anti-Free Speech Itch

    Bernie Sanders, greedy for power to punish people he considers greedy, has occasioned 2016’s best joke (reported in Bloomberg Businessweek): “In the Bernie Sanders drinking game, every time he mentions a free government program, you drink someone else’s beer.” But neither Sanders’s nor Hillary Clinton’s hostility to the First Amendment is amusing.

  • After Iowa, Will Republicans Finally get a Contest Without Trump?

    After Iowa, Will Republicans Finally get a Contest Without Trump?

    When Huck Finn asked Tom Sawyer what a Moslem is, Tom said a Moslem is someone who is not a Presbyterian, which is true, but not the whole truth. Donald Trump says he is a Presbyterian (“I drink my little wine . . . and have my little cracker”), which apparently was not good enough for enough of Iowa’s evangelical Christians.

  • The Simple Arithmetic That Could Jump-Start America's Economic Growth

    The Simple Arithmetic That Could Jump-Start America’s Economic Growth

    Woodrow Wilson, who enjoyed moralizing about the mundane, called paying taxes a “glorious privilege.”

  • Michael Bloomberg: An Echo, not a Choice

    Michael Bloomberg: An Echo, not a Choice

    Michael Bloomberg’s epiphany about the 2016 presidential proceedings is that what is missing is a second bossy, big-government billionaire from Manhattan’s East Side — another candidate with malleable party loyalties.

  • Keep an Eye on Chris Christie

    Keep an Eye on Chris Christie

    Iowa and New Hampshire together have just 1.4 percent of the U.S. population, which is why it is fine for them to begin the presidential selection process: Small states reward an underdog’s retail politics.

  • Marco Rubio's Record of Bad Judgment

    Marco Rubio’s Record of Bad Judgment

    What boxer Sonny Liston’s manager said of him (Sonny had his good points, the trouble was his bad points) is true of Marco Rubio.

  • A Missouri Town Demands Substantive Due Process

    A Missouri Town Demands Substantive Due Process

    If Pagedale, Mo., is a glimpse of the future, the future is going to be annoying. Pagedale might represent the future of governance unless some of its residents succeed in their lawsuit against their government.

  • The Most Important State in the 2016 Primary

    The Most Important State in the 2016 Primary

    Sen. Tim Scott, who evidently has not received the memo explaining that politics is a grim and bitter business, laughs easily and often, as when, during lunch in this city’s humming downtown, he explains that South Carolina’s Lowcountry is benefiting from what are called “halfbacks.”

  • Battling the Modern American Administrative State

    Battling the Modern American Administrative State

    As the administrative state distorts the United States’ constitutional architecture, Clarence Thomas becomes America’s indispensable constitutionalist. Now in his 25th year on the Supreme Court, he is urging the judicial branch to limit the legislative branch’s practice of delegating its power to the executive branch.

  • After Paris, We Should Look to Chris Christie

    After Paris, We Should Look to Chris Christie

    Paris was for all Americans, but especially for Republicans, a summons to seriousness that should have two immediate impacts on the Republican presidential contest. It should awaken the party’s nominating electorate from its reveries about treating the presidency as an entry-level job.