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George F. Will is one of the most widely recognized, and widely read, writers in the world. With more than 450 newspapers, his biweekly Newsweek column, and his appearances as a political commentator on ABC, Will may be the most influential writer in America.
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RECENT ARTICLES

  • After Iowa, Will Republicans Finally get a Contest Without Trump?

    After Iowa, Will Republicans Finally get a Contest Without Trump?

    When Huck Finn asked Tom Sawyer what a Moslem is, Tom said a Moslem is someone who is not a Presbyterian, which is true, but not the whole truth. Donald Trump says he is a Presbyterian (“I drink my little wine . . . and have my little cracker”), which apparently was not good enough for enough of Iowa’s evangelical Christians.

  • The Simple Arithmetic That Could Jump-Start America's Economic Growth

    The Simple Arithmetic That Could Jump-Start America’s Economic Growth

    Woodrow Wilson, who enjoyed moralizing about the mundane, called paying taxes a “glorious privilege.”

  • Michael Bloomberg: An Echo, not a Choice

    Michael Bloomberg: An Echo, not a Choice

    Michael Bloomberg’s epiphany about the 2016 presidential proceedings is that what is missing is a second bossy, big-government billionaire from Manhattan’s East Side — another candidate with malleable party loyalties.

  • Keep an Eye on Chris Christie

    Keep an Eye on Chris Christie

    Iowa and New Hampshire together have just 1.4 percent of the U.S. population, which is why it is fine for them to begin the presidential selection process: Small states reward an underdog’s retail politics.

  • Marco Rubio's Record of Bad Judgment

    Marco Rubio’s Record of Bad Judgment

    What boxer Sonny Liston’s manager said of him (Sonny had his good points, the trouble was his bad points) is true of Marco Rubio.

  • A Missouri Town Demands Substantive Due Process

    A Missouri Town Demands Substantive Due Process

    If Pagedale, Mo., is a glimpse of the future, the future is going to be annoying. Pagedale might represent the future of governance unless some of its residents succeed in their lawsuit against their government.

  • The Most Important State in the 2016 Primary

    The Most Important State in the 2016 Primary

    Sen. Tim Scott, who evidently has not received the memo explaining that politics is a grim and bitter business, laughs easily and often, as when, during lunch in this city’s humming downtown, he explains that South Carolina’s Lowcountry is benefiting from what are called “halfbacks.”

  • Battling the Modern American Administrative State

    Battling the Modern American Administrative State

    As the administrative state distorts the United States’ constitutional architecture, Clarence Thomas becomes America’s indispensable constitutionalist. Now in his 25th year on the Supreme Court, he is urging the judicial branch to limit the legislative branch’s practice of delegating its power to the executive branch.

  • After Paris, We Should Look to Chris Christie

    After Paris, We Should Look to Chris Christie

    Paris was for all Americans, but especially for Republicans, a summons to seriousness that should have two immediate impacts on the Republican presidential contest. It should awaken the party’s nominating electorate from its reveries about treating the presidency as an entry-level job.

  • The Government Wants In On The Fantasy Sports Action

    The Government Wants In On The Fantasy Sports Action

    Americans have been betting on sports since the first time a Puritan pilgrim boasted that his horse was the fastest in Massachusetts Bay Colony and another said, “Wanna bet?” But fish gotta swim, birds gotta fly, and government gotta fret about gambling on fantasy sports.

  • The GOP's Justice Reform Opportunity

    The GOP’s Justice Reform Opportunity

    Problems cited by a federal appeals judge should disturb everyone, but especially African Americans.

  • The havoc that Trump wreaks — on his own party

    The havoc that Trump wreaks — on his own party

    Every sulfurous belch from the molten interior of the volcanic Trump phenomenon injures the chances of a Republican presidency. After Donald Trump finishes plastering a snarling face on conservatism, any Republican nominee will face a dauntingly steep climb to reach even the paltry numbers that doomed Mitt Romney

  • How Robert Conquest’s History Book Made History

    How Robert Conquest’s History Book Made History

    History books can be historic events, making history by ending important arguments. They can make it impossible for any intellectually honest person to assert certain propositions that once enjoyed considerable currency among people purporting to care about evidence.

  • 'Vocabulary of Mutilation': A Disturbing Primer on the War on Drugs

    ‘Vocabulary of Mutilation’: A Disturbing Primer on the War on Drugs

    Don Winslow, novelist and conscientious objector to America’s longest “war,” was skeptical when he was in Washington on a recent Sunday morning. This was shortly after news broke about the escape, from one of Mexico’s “maximum security” prisons, of Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán, head of the Sinaloa drug cartel.

  • The 110 Year-Old Case That Still Inspires Supreme Court Debates

    The 110 Year-Old Case That Still Inspires Supreme Court Debates

    Today’s most interesting debate about governance concerns a 110-year-old Supreme Court decision. Two participants in this debate are the chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court and a justice on the Supreme Court of Texas. The latter is trouncing the former.

  • Greek Crisis A Reminder That The European Union Was A Terrible Idea To Begin With

    Greek Crisis A Reminder That The European Union Was A Terrible Idea To Begin With

    When Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras decided to call a referendum on a bailout offer from Greece’s creditors — an offer that expired before Sunday’s referendum — he informed the Greek nation in a televised speech. At 1 a.m.

  • The Wrinkle in the Affordable Care Act decision

    The Wrinkle in the Affordable Care Act decision

    “What chumps!”

    — Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., June 29, 2015

  • On Obamacare, John Roberts Helps Overthrow the Constitution

    On Obamacare, John Roberts Helps Overthrow the Constitution

    Conservatives are dismayed about the Supreme Court’s complicity in rewriting the Affordable Care Act — its ratification of the IRS’s disregard of the statute’s plain and purposeful language. But they have contributed to this outcome. Their decades of populist praise of judicial deference to the political branches has borne this sour fruit.

  • Hillary Clinton’s Dodginess is Overpowering Her Message

    Hillary Clinton’s Dodginess is Overpowering Her Message

    Hillary Clinton’s reticence is drowning out her message, which is that she is the cure for the many ailments that afflict the United States during a second Democratic presidential term. Sen. Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) has called her “the most opaque person you’ll ever meet in your life,” but when opacity yields to the necessity of answering questions, here are a few:

  • McDonald’s, the ‘Progressive Burger Company’

    McDonald’s, the ‘Progressive Burger Company’

    In January, McDonald’s, leaning against the winds of fashion, said kale would never replace lettuce on its burgers. In May, however, it said it will test kale in a breakfast meal (breakfast is about 25 percent of McDonald’s sales). Kale might or might not cause construction workers to turn at 6 a.m. into McDonald’s drive-through lines, where approximately two-thirds of McDonald’s customers place their orders.