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George F. Will is one of the most widely recognized, and widely read, writers in the world. With more than 450 newspapers, his biweekly Newsweek column, and his appearances as a political commentator on ABC, Will may be the most influential writer in America.
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RECENT ARTICLES

  • A Cake is Food, Not Speech – But Why Bully the Baker?

    The conversation about a cake lasted less than a minute but will long reverberate in constitutional law. On Tuesday, the Supreme Court is scheduled to hear 60 minutes of speech about when, if at all, making a cake counts as constitutionally protected speech and, if so, what the implications are for the Colorado Civil Rights Commission’s contention that Jack Phillips violated the state’s law against sexual-orientation discrimination.

  • The Supreme Court Should Let States Set Their Own Sports Gambling Laws

    American democracy’s comic opera frequently features collaborations of “bootleggers and Baptists.” These entertainments are so named because during Prohibition, Baptists thought banning Demon Rum would improve public morals (oh, well) and bootleggers favored the ban because it made scarce a commodity for which there was a demand that they could profitably supply. On Monday, the Supreme Court will listen — with, one hopes, a mixture of bemusement and amusement — to arguments concerning another prohibition.

  • The NCAA Season Starts with Sleaze and Scandal

    Although it is plausible to suspect this, it is not true that the Crédit Mobilier scandal of the early 1870s (financial shenanigans by politicians and others surrounding construction of the Union Pacific Railroad) and the 1920s Teapot Dome scandal (shady dealings by politicians and others concerning government oil leases) were entangled with Division I college basketball programs. Back then, there were no such programs. About the 1970s Watergate scandal, however, suspicions remain.

  • Another Year of American Hilarity

    Tryptophan, an amino acid in turkey, is unjustly blamed for what mere gluttony does, making Americans comatose every fourth Thursday in November. But before nodding off, give thanks for another year of American hilarity.

  • 2018’s Most Important, Expensive and Strange Election

    This state’s story, which lately has been depressing, soon will acquire a riveting new chapter. In 2018, Illinois will have the nation’s most important, expensive and strange election.

  • Roy Moore is an Embarrassment – Doug Jones Deserves to Win

    But for the bomb, the four would be in their 60s, probably grandmothers. Three were 14 and one was 11 in 1963 when the blast killed them in the 16th Street Baptist Church, which is four blocks from the law office of Doug Jones, who then was 9.

  • Here’s an Idea, Republicans: Repeal and Replace the Tax Code

    The Republicans’ tax bill would somewhat improve the existing revenue system that once caused Mitch Daniels (former head of the Office of Management and Budget, former Indiana governor) to say: Wouldn’t it be nice to have a tax code that looked as though it had been designed on purpose? Today’s bill, which is 429 pages and is apt to grow, is an implausible instrument of simplification. And it would worsen the tax code’s already substantial contribution to “moral hazard.”

  • The Republicans Take Aim at Academic Excellence

    Such is the federal government’s sprawl, and its power to establish new governing precedents, mere Washington twitches can jeopardize venerable principles and institutions. This is illustrated by a seemingly small but actually momentous provision of the Republicans’ tax bill — a 1.4 percent excise | Read More »

  • Hysterical Mobs are Crudely Judging History – One Book Offers a Better Way

    Evidence of national discernment, although never abundant, can now be found high on the New York Times combined print and e-book best-seller list. There sits Ron Chernow’s biography of Ulysses S. Grant, which no reader will wish were shorter than its 1,074 pages. Arriving at a moment when excitable individuals and hysterical mobs are demonstrating crudeness in assessing historical figures, Chernow’s book is a tutorial on measured, mature judgment.

  • The Radiating Mischief of Protectionism

    What a tangled web we weave when first we practice to deceive ourselves into believing that corporate welfare can be seemly. Consider the caper, both amusing and depressing, that began when mighty Boeing sought protection behind the skirts of the Commerce Department. | Read More »

  • Why All the Love for the Chicago Cubs’ Woes?

    The good news, a commodity in short supply, is that Americans are about to get a respite from the inundating Niagara of candidates’ blather. The bad news is that the respite will be a tsunami of Cubs Gush, which will slosh from sea to shining sea.

  • Baseball's storyteller, our friend

    Baseball’s storyteller, our friend

    For 67 years, the son of Vincent and Bridget Scully, immigrants who came to New York City from County Cavan, Ireland, has been plying his trade.

  • Trump’s Shallowness Runs Deep

    Trump’s Shallowness Runs Deep

    In the 1870s, when Boss Tweed’s Tammany Hall controlled New York City, and in the 1950s and 1960s, when Chicago’s Democratic machine was especially rampant, there was a phenomenon that can be called immunity through profusion: Fresh scandals arrived with | Read More »

  • How Entangled With Russia Is Trump?

    How Entangled With Russia Is Trump?

    To gauge the opportunism and hypocrisy that define Donald Trump’s Republican Party, consider this: Imagine the scalding rhetoric that would have boiled from the likes of Newt Gingrich, that Metternich of many green rooms, if Hillary Clinton had offhandedly undermined | Read More »

  • The Path Ahead for Hillary

    The Path Ahead for Hillary

    En route to fight one of his many duels, French politician Georges Clemenceau bought a one-way train ticket. Was he pessimistic? “Not at all. I always use my opponent’s return ticket for the trip back.” Some Hillary Clinton advisers, although | Read More »

  • Will Pliable Pence Amend His Convictions?

    Will Pliable Pence Amend His Convictions?

    Crucial political decisions often concern which bridges to cross and which to burn. Donald Trump’s dilemma is that he burns some bridges by the way he crosses others. His campaign depends on a low-probability event, and on his ability to | Read More »

  • With Texas, A Wall Too High For the GOP?

    With Texas, A Wall Too High For the GOP?

    Political conventions are echo chambers designed to generate feelings of invincibility, sending forth the party faithful with a spring in their steps and hope in their hearts. Who would want to be a wet blanket at such moveable feasts? Steve | Read More »

  • GOP Minds Are at Sea - But Not the Right One

    GOP Minds Are at Sea – But Not the Right One

    Neither the unanimous decision by the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, nor China’s rejection of it, was surprising. The timing of it was, however, as serendipitous as China’s rejection is ominous. Coming as Republican delegates convene on Lake | Read More »

  • The Travesty of Teacher Tenure

    The Travesty of Teacher Tenure

    The mills of justice grind slowly, but life plunges on, leaving lives blighted when justice, by being delayed, is irremediably denied. Fortunately, California’s Supreme Court might soon decide to hear — four years after litigation began — the 21st century’s | Read More »

  • Slow Economic Growth--New Normal for America?

    Slow Economic Growth–New Normal for America?

    America’s economy has now slouched into the eighth year of a recovery that demonstrates how much we have defined recovery down. The idea that essentially zero interest rates are, after seven and a half years, stimulating the economy “strains credulity,” | Read More »