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George F. Will is one of the most widely recognized, and widely read, writers in the world. With more than 450 newspapers, his biweekly Newsweek column, and his appearances as a political commentator on ABC, Will may be the most influential writer in America.
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RECENT ARTICLES

  • The Export-Import Bank’s grip

    The Export-Import Bank’s grip

    Conservatives’ next disappointment will at least be a validation.

  • Obama needs GOP for TPP

    Obama needs GOP for TPP

    The two largest achievements during Bill Clinton’s presidency occurred in spite of Democrats.

  • Stopping the IRS

    Stopping the IRS

    If the he court rules that the IRS acted contrary to law, it certainly will not have acted contrary to its pattern of corruption in the service of the current administration.

  • Two reading lessons from the Supreme Court

    Two reading lessons from the Supreme Court

    This week, in oral arguments concerning two cases, the justices’ task will be to teach remedial reading to Congress and to Arizona.

  • Reversing course in Illinois

    Reversing course in Illinois

    The most portentous election of 2014 has initiated this century’s most intriguing political experiment.

  • Tweeting against terrorism   

    Tweeting against terrorism  

    U.S. “countermessaging” against the Islamic State will use up to 140 characters to persuade persons who are tempted to join in its barbarism that these behaviors are not nice.

  • War authorization’s difficult debate

    War authorization’s difficult debate

    Americans, a litigious people, believe that rules for coping with messy reality can be written in tidy legal language.

  • Curb your pessimism

    Curb your pessimism

    The world might currently seem unusually disorderly, but it can be so without being unusually dangerous.

  • The Pence paradox

    The Pence paradox

    Although he is always preternaturally placid, Mike Pence today exemplifies a Republican conundrum.

  • Education is the business of the states

    Education is the business of the states

    Although liberal academia deserves its government-inflicted miseries, Alexander’s next project will be deregulation of higher education.

  • Defining economic failure down

    Defining economic failure down

    Economic weakness — new business formations are at a 35-year low — is both a cause and a consequence of alarming cultural changes.

  • A season of wretched excess

    A season of wretched excess

    The State of the Union has become, under presidents of both parties, a political pep rally degrading to everyone.

  • Bud Selig’s winning legacy

    Bud Selig’s winning legacy

    The business of baseball and the nation’s business used to be conducted in Washington with similar skill.

  • Vermont’s Sanders has mountains to climb

    Vermont’s Sanders has mountains to climb

    Sanders calls himself an independent, although he caucuses and reliably votes with Senate Democrats.

  • The mushrooming welfare state

    The mushrooming welfare state

    America’s national character will have to be changed if progressives are going to implement their agenda.

  • Mitt’s third run would be no charm

    Mitt’s third run would be no charm

    Mitt Romney might understandably think that a third try would have a happy ending in a successful presidency. First, however, he must be a candidate.

  • The Keystone catechism

    The Keystone catechism

    Not since the multiplication of the loaves and fishes near the Sea of Galilee has there been creativity as miraculous as that of the Keystone XL pipeline.

  • Questions for a nominee

    Questions for a nominee

    “I’m watching everything you do with a fine-toothed comb.”

  • Climate change’s instructive past   

    Climate change’s instructive past  

    We know, because they often say so, that those who think catastrophic global warming is probable and perhaps imminent are exemplary empiricists.

  • The senator to watch in 2015

    The senator to watch in 2015

    Bob Corker, R-Tenn., incoming chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee, may be the senator who matters most in 2015.