SEARCH ALL ARTICLES BY Michael Barone:
Mr. Barone is a resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, a Fox News Channel contributor and the principal co-author of The Almanac of American Politics, published by National Journal every two years.

Sign Up

RECENT ARTICLES

  • Two Impossible Things That Could Happen in 2016

    Two Impossible Things That Could Happen in 2016

    A number of once unlikely scenarios for the 2016 election might now be moving into the realm of possibility. Republicans and Democrats alike may soon face the consequences.

  • Hillary Clinton and 'Black Lives Matter': An Unproductive Confrontation

    Hillary Clinton and ‘Black Lives Matter’: An Unproductive Confrontation

    Reporters and voters have so far gotten few glimpses of Hillary Clinton speaking candidly. One of the few examples available is in the videotape and transcript of her meeting with Black Lives Matter protesters in New Hampshire last week.

  • Donald Trump's Half-Serious, Half-Fantasy Immigration Plan

    Donald Trump’s Half-Serious, Half-Fantasy Immigration Plan

    Donald Trump’s six-page platform on immigration may not be, as Ann Coulter wrote, “the greatest political document since the Magna Carta.” But given the issue’s role in elevating the candidate to leading Republican polls, it merits serious attention.

  • The Strange Death of the Center-Left

    The Strange Death of the Center-Left

    In 1935 George Dangerfield published “The Strange Death of Liberal England, 1910-1914,” a vivid account of how Britain’s center-left Liberal Party, dominant for a century, collapsed amid conflicts it could not resolve.

  • Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton: Incapable of Embarrassment

    Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton: Incapable of Embarrassment

    August is traditionally a vacation month, and East Coast elites, following European tradition, are thick on the ground in the Hamptons, Martha’s Vineyard (the Obamas’ choice) and Nantucket.

  • A Tough Day for the President and His Party

    A Tough Day for the President and His Party

    Thursday was the biggest night of the political year so far, for what happened on the stage at Cleveland’s Quicken Loans Arena and for what happened offstage as well.

  • Too Many Candidates to Fit on a Stage: Democrats Then, Republicans Now

    Too Many Candidates to Fit on a Stage: Democrats Then, Republicans Now

    Why did Fox News decide to schedule two Republican presidential debates rather than one? Simple arithmetic: 90 minutes divided by 17 candidates equals 5 minutes and 29 seconds apiece. That’s scarcely enough time for the oral equivalent of a few tweets.

  • Obama Bets Nuclear Deal Will Change Iran's Regime; Few Agree

    Obama Bets Nuclear Deal Will Change Iran’s Regime; Few Agree

    “Faute de mieux.” That means “for want of something better” in Secretary of State John Kerry’s second language. It’s also the best case made by its journalistic defenders for approval of the nuclear weapons deal Kerry negotiated with Iran. Or to be more exact, for rallying 34 votes in the Senate or 146 votes in the House to uphold a presidential veto of a congressional vote to disapprove.

  • Asymmetrical Politics: Republicans Act Like an Unruly Mob, Democrats Like a Regimented Army

    Asymmetrical Politics: Republicans Act Like an Unruly Mob, Democrats Like a Regimented Army

    As the presidential campaign heats up, and we head into the first debate among the 16 declared Republican candidates, there is an asymmetry between the two political parties.

  • Is America Entering a New Victorian Era?

    Is America Entering a New Victorian Era?

    Forty-seven years ago, the musical “Hair” opened on Broadway. Elderly mavens — the core theater audience then, unlike the throngs of tourists flocking to cheap movie adaptations today — were instructed that America was entering an “Age of Aquarius.” The old moral rules were extinct: we were entering a new era of freedom, experimentation and self-expression.

  • Increasingly Divided Democrats Causing Problems for Their Party

    Increasingly Divided Democrats Causing Problems for Their Party

    America’s two major political parties have a difficult task: amassing a 51 percent coalition in a nation that has always been — not just now, but from the beginning — regionally, religiously, racially and ethnically diverse.

  • Hillary Clinton's Economics: Suddenly It's 1947

    Hillary Clinton’s Economics: Suddenly It’s 1947

    Like it or not, Hillary Clinton is the single individual most likely to be elected the next president. So it’s worthwhile looking closely at and behind her words when she deigns to speak on public policy, as she did in | Read More »

  • Disruptive Politics: Trump as a Third Party Candidate

    Disruptive Politics: Trump as a Third Party Candidate

    “My sole focus is to run as a Republican,” Donald Trump told my Washington Examiner colleague Byron York last week, “because of the fact that I believe that this is the best way we can defeat the Democrats.” He went on, “Having a two-party race gives us a much better chance of beating Hillary and bringing our country back than having a third-party candidate.”

  • What (Little) You See of Hillary Clinton Is What You'll Get If She Wins

    What (Little) You See of Hillary Clinton Is What You’ll Get If She Wins

    It says something about Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign that it was big news that she submitted herself to an interview with a cable news journalist. It also says something that the journalist selected for this honor, Brianna Keilar of CNN, was recently a guest at the wedding of the director of grassroots engagement for the Clinton campaign. Makes sense to hedge your risk.

  • Redistricting Not Worth the Verbal Footwork

    Redistricting Not Worth the Verbal Footwork

    “Words mean what they say,” I wrote in my Washington Examiner column one week ago. But, as I added, not necessarily to a majority of justices of the Supreme Court. The targets of my column were the majority opinions in King v. Burwell and Texas Department of Community Affairs v. The Inclusive Communities Project.

  • Patriotism, Optimism and Good-Natured Debate

    Patriotism, Optimism and Good-Natured Debate

    The Fourth of July is a time to remember Americans who have contributed much to their country, and this Fourth weekend is a good time to remember two such Americans who died in recent weeks — and whom I’d had the good fortune to know and joust with intellectually since the 1970s — Allen Weinstein and Ben Wattenberg.

  • Supreme Court Lets Obama Administration Say Words Don't Mean What They Say

    Supreme Court Lets Obama Administration Say Words Don’t Mean What They Say

    For most people, words mean what they say. But not necessarily for a majority of Supreme Court justices in two important decisions handed down Thursday. In the most prominent, King v. Burwell, Chief Justice John Roberts, writing for a 6-3 majority, | Read More »

  • Facing a Changing World Balance, Obama Makes Odd Choices

    Facing a Changing World Balance, Obama Makes Odd Choices

    Is the world back to where it was around the year 1800? One could come to that conclusion after reading British historian John Darwin’s recent book “After Tamerlane,” which assesses the rises and falls of empires after the death in 1405 of the famously bloodthirsty Muslim Mongol monarch.

  • Clinton's Weakness in Important States

    Clinton’s Weakness in Important States

    Hillary Clinton has relaunched her campaign on Roosevelt Island with a 4,687-word speech. But it’s not clear whether she and her husband, Bill Clinton, can win four presidential elections as Franklin D. Roosevelt did.

  • Foreign Policy Downplayed in Jeb and Hillary Announcement Speeches

    Foreign Policy Downplayed in Jeb and Hillary Announcement Speeches

    American presidents have greater leeway on foreign policy than on domestic issues. Just see how President Obama is forging ahead to an agreement with Iran opposed by large majorities in Congress and among voters.