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American migration to right-to-work states continued in 2014

American migration to right-to-work states continued in 2014

This article originally appeared on watchdog.org.

Labor bosses portray states where right-to-work laws make union dues optional as impoverished wastelands, but Americans continue flocking to those places.

Annual interstate migration studies from Allied Van Lines, Atlas Van Lines and United Van Lines offer an early look at how each state performed in terms of inbound versus outbound migration in 2014. U.S. Census Bureau migration survey data will not be released until later in the year.

While each state’s weather and other variables are obviously major factors, data from the three shipping companies suggest Americans are unconvinced by union propaganda about low wages and deadly conditions created by right-to-work laws.

The states with the most net inbound Allied Van Lines moveswere right-to-work states Texas, Florida, Arizona and South Carolina. Illinois, Pennsylvania and New York — all forced-unionism states — had the most net outbound Allied moves.

Based on each state’s ratio of inbound to outbound Allied moves, seven of the top 10 states were right-to-work states; only three of the bottom 10 states were right-to-work states.

Right-to-work states are listed in bold in the following table.

Highest Ratio of Inbound 2014 Moves: Allied Van Lines Lowest Ratio of Inbound 2014 Moves: Allied Van Lines
  1. Montana
  2. Alaska
  3. Idaho
  4. Oregon
  5. Arizona
  6. Florida
  7. Texas
  8. South Carolina
  9. Utah
  10. Wyoming
  1.  New Jersey
  2. West Virginia
  3. Pennsylvania
  4. Michigan
  5. Illinois
  6. South Dakota
  7. New York
  8. Connecticut
  9. Iowa
  10. Maryland

Texas and Florida were also the states with the most net inbound Atlas Van Lines moves in 2014. The six states with the most net outbound Atlas moves were forced-unionism states New York, Illinois, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Minnesota.

Seven of the 10 states with the highest ratios of inbound to outbound Atlas moves were right-to-work states. Eight of the 10 states with the lowest ratios of inbound to outbound moves were forced-unionism states.

Right-to-work states are listed in bold below.

Highest Ratio of Inbound 2014 Moves: Atlas Van Lines Lowest Ratio of Inbound 2014 Moves: Atlas Van Lines
  1. North Dakota
  2. North Carolina
  3. Texas
  4. Idaho
  5. Mississippi
  6. Oregon
  7. New Hampshire
  8. Florida
  9. Tennessee
  10. Washington
  1. New York
  2. Illinois
  3. Delaware
  4. Connecticut
  5. Minnesota
  6. Ohio
  7. New Jersey
  8. Nebraska
  9. Wyoming
  10. West Virginia

Right-to-work states Florida, Texas and North Carolina were the top three states for net inbound United Van Lines moves in 2014. New York, Illinois, New Jersey and Ohio had the most net outbound United moves.

In a list including Washington, D.C., seven of the 10 states with the highest ratios of inbound United moves were right-to-work states. Only two of the 10 states with the lowest ratios of inbound moves were right-to-work states.

Right-to-work states are listed in bold below.

Highest Ratio of Inbound 2014 Moves: United Van Lines Lowest Ratio of Inbound 2014 Moves: United Van Lines
  1. Oregon
  2. South Carolina
  3. North Carolina
  4. Vermont
  5. Florida
  6. Nevada
  7. Texas
  8. D.C.
  9. Oklahoma
  10. Idaho
  1. New Jersey
  2. New York
  3. Illinois
  4. North Dakota
  5. West Virginia
  6. Ohio
  7. Kansas
  8. New Mexico
  9. Pennsylvania
  10. Connecticut

“We’ve seen for a number of years now that Americans are voting with their feet and leaving forced unionism states for Right to Work states,” Patrick Semmens, vice president for public information at National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation, said in an email to Watchdog.org.

“Which makes perfect sense. First, we know that the Right to Work principle, that union membership and payment of dues or fees should be voluntary not coerced, is overwhelmingly popular,” Semmens continued. “Polls consistently show 75-80 (percent) of Americans favor Right to Work.”

“Second, Right to Work and job creation go hand in hand, so people move where they are most likely to have good work opportunities.

“As for union officials’ attempts to demean the quality of the jobs workers have in Right to Work states, their claims don’t stand up to scrutiny,” Semmens said. “Once you adjust for the cost of living (which as a whole is lower in Right to Work states) workers in Right to Work states have $3,000 more disposable income each year.”


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