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‘Girls Just Wanna Have Guns’ foundress speaks up for female gun rights

'Girls Just Wanna Have Guns' foundress speaks up for female gun rights

Florida Jiu-Jitsu trainer and Second Amendment leader told Guns & Patriots women purchasing firearms is a growing trend that, if sustained, will force anti-gun politicians and anti-gun media to back-off gun owners.

“If you want to empower a woman – give her a gun,” said Regis Giles, creator and owner of Girls Just Wanna Have Guns, a news, information website, developed in 2010 to motivate women to prepare themselves for any threat they may encounter. “The website received a shockwave of attention.”

Since more and more women are purchasing firearms and learning how to defend themselves, she said gun boutiques are marketing their products for women, and gun training courses for women are on the rise. “Some women buy guns for recreation and some buy guns for hunting, but the majority of women are purchasing firearms for self defense.”

An armed female is 10-times more likely to defeat an attacker than an unarmed female, she said. “A gun in a woman’s hand is her best chance of survival.” A woman who is armed is less likely to be a victim of violence while a woman who is unarmed is more vulnerable to being kidnapped, raped, or killed, she said.

“Women know they are the weaker sex – they are not naïve to think they can defend themselves against a stronger and bigger man.” As many as 200,000 women use a gun each year to defend themselves against sexual attacks and as many as 2 million law abiding citizens use guns each year to defend themselves against criminals, said Giles, who is a big game huntress. “Being armed and protected will prevent violence.”

After four years in operation, Girls Just Wanna Have Guns are planning a 90-minute documentary motion picture next year that she said will feature individual women across the nation who used self defense to protect themselves and their loved ones. “Now we have the good girl living and the bad guy dying.”

In addition to encouraging women to learn how to defend themselves, she said the initiative will seek to prevent politicians from passing onerous gun control laws and expose the hypocrisy of a main stream media that arbitrarily demonizes gun owners, she said. “The film will serve as a wake-up call to all Americans.”

Giles, who created Girls Just Wanna Have Guns at the young age of 18, said self protection is a natural right that government cannot take away. “I was trained at a very early age, studying Jiu-Jitsu and learning how to shoot guns.” Now she is the first female Black belt in Jiu-Jitsu at the Valente Brothers Jiu-Jitsu school for self defense in North Miami Beach.

Having received her Black belt at Helio Gracie Belt Ceremony earlier this month, she said it was one of the top three experiences in her lifetime. In preparation for Black belt, she said she had been training six days out of the week for nine years with the Valente Brothers school.

“I can fight,” she said. “If you are trying to take me, you will have one hell of a time.”

Being proactive about learning self defense, improving technique, and training in weapons, are all ways for women to increase their chances of surviving an attack, she said. “Women have taken it upon themselves to rely upon no one but themselves.” And they are safer for it, said Giles.

“Whether the weapon of choice is a gun, tazer, knife, spear, pencil or some form of martial arts, the most important thing is that women arm themselves with the right attitude and skills necessary to effectively and efficiently turn from prey to formidable defender.”

 


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