Judiciary

Conservative Christians Have Faith in Alito

The Family Research Council’s “Justice Sunday III” will kick off Sunday night with a lineup of well-known conservatives (most notably Pennsylvania GOP Sen. Rick Santorum) and a goal of energizing like-minded Christians in the political process.

Earlier today Family Research Council President Tony Perkins and the Rev. Jerry Falwell took part in a conference call with reporters to preview Sunday’s event, which is expected to generate much attention on the eve on Supreme Court nominee Samuel Alito’s confirmation hearings.

Falwell played up attacks on Christian beliefs as the driving motivation to bring the event to Philadelphia’s Greater Exodus Baptist Church, whose pastor, the Rev. Herbert Lusk, has publicly and enthusiastically supported President Bush.

“Across the country, this hostility against Christ and the church and Christian people is manifesting itself in almost every front,” Falwell told reporters. “We on Sunday night … are addressing this issue and attempting to awaken the American people that we either stand up now and drive back these anti-Christian forces or our children and children’s children will be the losers.”

During the call, I asked Perkins if he made an overture to Senate Judiciary Chairman Arlen Specter (R.-Pa.), whose home is in Philadelphia. His clear and concise answer: “No.”

That’s not surprising since the pro-choice Specter would probably be booed off the stage. After all, the Family Research Council joined other conservative groups in an attempt to derail Specter’s chairmanship of the Judiciary Committee after his 2004 re-election.

Perkins told reporters that the goal of “Justice Sunday III,” which will be telecast to millions of homes across America, doesn’t stop Sunday night.

“Part of what these simulcasts tend to do is not simply [be] a television broadcast,” Perkins said. “These are issues — religious liberty — that transcend denominations, race and even political party. So what we’re seeing happening is a coming together of people of faith — black, white, Hispanics, Asians — who care deeply about these issues.

“So part of this will be follow-up communication through confirmation week, daily communications with people throughout the country, with directions on who to contact and where there may be problems,” Perkins added. “We’re really serving as their eyes and ears to the confirmation process.”

“Justice Sunday III” will be broadcast live in churches across the United States, carried on hundreds of radio stations, via satellite and webcast on www.JusticeSunday.com.


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